The Outrider Podcast

Interview 30 Troy James Weaver

In today’s episode I talk with Troy James Weaver about some real inside the Wichita metro area stuff, but then we delve into all sorts of things: the problems with semi-autobiographical fiction, a writer’s education, sticking with the Russian guy, Black Cloud by Juliet Escoria, Crapalachia by Scott McClanahan the role of small presses, having balls and starting literary feuds - and why he misspelled his hometown on the cover of his book.

Troy is the author of two books, both out this year. The first is Witchita Stories, out from Future Tense Books (futuretensebooks.com), and Visions, out from Broken River Books (brokenriverbooks.com). You can grab them online, of course, or hit up your local independent bookstore. 

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The Laboratory #2 with Stephen McClurg

In this episode, Stephen McClurg and I discuss the different ways we approached last month’s exercise rules, and then share our results. This month’s exercise is derived from a method used by Ben Nyberg in his book One Great Way to Write Short Stories. It’s been out of print for quite a while, but you might be able to find on via Abebooks.com. 

You can see our finished exercises here: http://jquinnmalott.com/page7/index.html

Stephen McClurg teaches and lives in Birmingham, Alabama. After winning the National Cherry Blossom Festival Haiku Contest, he spent a week writing haiku for the Washington Post‘s blog. In the past he has published articles, essays, reviews, short stories, poems, and comics in newspapers, journals online and otherwise, and appeared in the anthologies You Ain’t No Dancer and Voices from a Safe Harbor. He has written and composed music for award-winning short films, art installations, and dance.

Exercise #2 Rules

1) Use a violent event from your life

2) Write about the event in first person

3) Rewrite it in third person.

4) Rewrite it again from the other person’s POV

Note on the rules: although this is take from a book on writing short stories, if you want to use the rules to write a poem, that’s cool too. 

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Shoptalk #7 with Gavin Pate

After some wrangling and fuzzy scheduling, it’s finally back on with a new guest. With episode 7 of Shoptalk I bring in Gavin Pate to chat with me about the day-to-day and year-to-year of being a writer in the world when you’re not famous or pushing a brand new book. This is the long haul version of the podcast, unlike the get-to-know-you episodes. In here, we talk shop.

Gavin is Associate Professor of English at Virginia Wesleyan College, and the author of the novel The Way to Get Here from Bootstrap Press (http://www.bootstrappress.org/about/). His short fiction has appeared in several journals and been included in the Velvet Anthology Warmed & Bound.

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The Laboratory #1 with Stephen McClurg

Trying something new in this episode. The Laboratory will appear on the first Monday of every month. In each episode, my co-host and I will discuss experimentation in literature (as well as many other things) and - this will be the laboratory part - we’ll assign ourselves a writing exercise each month. This month, it’s a cut-up hybrid exercise. You can find the rules/guidelines at the end of the show notes.

Stephen McClurg teaches and lives in Birmingham, Alabama. After winning the National Cherry Blossom Festival Haiku Contest, he spent a week writing haiku for the Washington Post‘s blog. In the past he has published articles, essays, reviews, short stories, poems, and comics in newspapers, journals online and otherwise, and appeared in the anthologies You Ain’t No Dancer and Voices from a Safe Harbor. He has written and composed music for award-winning short films, art installations, and dance.

Rules for Exercise #1

Use the following three techniques to create a new text. It’s not required to make sense.

1) Take 1-2 pages from a mass market paperback - black out sections or cut up the pages to create a “new” text.

2) incorporate a second none-prose text, either song lyrics, a poem, bits from a screenplay

3) generate original text using automatic/free writing for 5 - 10 minutes.

4) OPTIONAL - try to generate a coherent text or narrative out of the three sections. 

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Special: Genre Wars with Jenn Zukowski

Back in February, Kazuo Ishiguro made a comment in a NY Times article about him and his new novel The Sleeping Giant, that made Ursula K. Le Guin upset enough to write an article defending the fantasy genre and reviewing Ishiguro’s book . . . unfavorably. 

I had read the Electric Literature article and shrugged. My grad school friend, Jenn Zukowski, read the Esquire article and posted it to Facebook, tagging me and asking me what I thought because we’d argued about genre a lot fifteen years ago and, at least between us, settled it.

We decided we’d get together and record a special show where we revisited our old argument in light of this new skirmish in the so-called “Genre Wars.” Jenn was the very first guest on The Outrider Podcast, and she teaches at several Denver area universities specializing in stage combat, creative writing, and literature, including classes on fantasy and children’s lit. You can find out more about Jenn at her blog, https://jennzuko.wordpress.com and you can download her episode of the Outrider Podcast at this page of my website, http://jquinnmalott.com/iframe/page3.html, or http://jquinnmalott.podbean.com .

We hope you enjoy it. 

The Ishiguro vs. Le Guin Articles

NY Times Article on Ishiguro

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/20/books/for-kazuo-ishiguro-the-buried-giant-is-a-departure.html?_r=0

Ursula K. Le Guin’s smackdown

http://bookviewcafe.com/blog/2015/03/02/are-they-going-to-say-this-is-fantasy/

The Electric Literature piece about the dust-up

http://electricliterature.com/the-last-holdouts-of-the-genre-wars-on-kazuo-ishiguro-ursula-k-le-guin-and-the-misuse-of-labels/

The Esquire article about the dust-up

http://www.esquire.com/entertainment/books/a33599/genre-fiction-vs-literary-fiction/

A Good Critical analysis of the who she-bang. 

http://flavorwire.com/508134/kazuo-ishiguros-the-buried-giant-and-the-tyranny-of-genre-fiction

Older articles about the Genre Wars and the Pullman speech

http://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2013/may/17/genre-wars-fiction-book-trade

http://www.tessgerritsen.com/genre-wars-never-seem-to-end/

http://flavorwire.com/487948/the-secret-truce-in-the-literary-genre-wars

http://www.tor.com/blogs/2013/05/are-the-genre-wars-won

http://creativewritingguild.com/lesson/sa/micros-pedestal-literary-elitism-and-the-genre-wars/

http://herocomplex.latimes.com/books/game-of-thrones-george-r-r-martin-fights-the-genre-wars/

The Pullman Speech

http://www.randomhouse.com/features/pullman/author/carnegie.php

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Episode 29 Lynn Sloan

In this episode I talk with author Lynn Sloan about the ghettoization of writers, the assumption of quiet domesticity,  the fact that old white men aren’t alone on top of the great mountain of literature, and her years as a photographer, including her time in New York working for a major magazine that made a game out of sneaking a picture of naked breasts into each issue.

Lynn is the author of Principles of Navigation, out now from Fomite Press. Lynn has had short stories appear in such journals as Sou’wester, Nimrod, and Puerto Del Sol, and she has been nominated for the Pushcart Award. She’s also been a finalist for the Dana Award and the Katherine Anne Porter Prize. Before writing, she was a photographer whose fine art photographs had been exhibited in galleries and museums around the world. You can learn more about Lynn at her website http://www.lynnsloan.com and you can learn more about her publisher, Fomite, at http://fomitepress.com/FOMITE/Home.html 

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Episode 28 Greg Michalson

In this episode, I talk with Greg Michalson, editor and co-publisher of Unbridled Books about his partnership with Fred Ramey, Greg’s time at The Missouri Review, influences like William Peden and Thomas McAfee (a collection of work is coming out this spring), Booches bar, messing with Texas, and the difficult conflict between being an editor and writer at the same time.

You can learn more about Unbridled Books, and the excellent work that Greg does, at http://unbridledbooks.com

Throughout the years, Greg and his publishing partner, Fred, have shepherded many find books into the world, such as Susan Vreeland’s bestseller, Girl in Hyacinth Blue, and Patricia Henley’s National Book Award finalist, Hummingbird House. Not to mention launching the career of recent NBA finalist Emily St. John Mandel (Station Eleven).

The Outrider Podcast is available on iTunes and Stitcher. You can also listen at my website (http://jquinnmalott.com/index.html). 

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Episode 27 Bonnie ZoBell

For this episode, I talk with Bonnie ZoBell about dogs and cats, growing up in southern California, tragic plane crashes, living in New York in the early 80’s, and the stamina it sometimes takes to be a writer when it seems no one wants to read your work. 

Bonnie’s short fiction has appeared in numerous journals, she’s received an NEA Fellowship and PEN Syndicated Fiction Award and has been a fellow at places Yaddo and MacDowell. In 2013, a collection of her flash fiction, The Whack-job Girls was published by Monkey Puzzle Press, and is distributed by Small Press Distribution. Last year, Press 53 published her excellent book What Happened Here: a novella and stories. You can learn more about Bonnie at her website http://bonniezobell.com, and find links to buy her books (although I recommend going through your favorite local independent bookstore). 

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Episode 26 Scott Phillips

Today I talk with Scott Phillips about growing up in Kansas, working in Paris as the world’s worst translator, his experience as a screenwriter in Hollywood, the inspiration behind The Ice Harvest, and how strip clubs are the saddest places on earth - even if they do make good settings for crime novels. 

We also talk a lot about his influences and like James Crumley, James Lee Burke, Rick DeMarinis (a lot of his books can be found at http://www.concordepress.com) and many other writers and books, so  get your pens ready. 

You can read more about Scott at his website http://www.scottphillipsauthor.com 

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Shoptalk #6 w/ Laura Hawley

This week Laura and I talk a bit about being ill, Chang Rae Lee’s On Such a Full Sea, Bonnie ZoBell’s What Happened Here, Scott Phillips’ Rut, The Showtime show Californication and it’s bizarre affect on my perception of the writing life. Where’s my Runkle? Fantasies I shouldn’t be having at 43, and all the stuff I’m working on. 

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